Czech Philharmonic Sheku Kanneh-Mason

Czech Philharmonic ⬩ Sheku Kanneh-Mason

24-year-old star cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason is one of the most sought-after artists of his generation. He makes his Czech Philharmonic debut with one of the most difficult but most beautiful works of the cello repertoire: Shostakovich’s First Cello Concerto. This concert series also features Haydn’s Symphony No. 22 ‘The Philosopher’ and a Beethoven symphony which one critic at the time of its premiere called “a writhing monster.”

Programme

Joseph Haydn
Symphony No. 44 in E minor, Hob I:44

Dmitri Shostakovich
Cello Concerto No. 1 in E flat major, Op. 107

Ludwig van Beethoven
Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 36

Performers

Sheku Kanneh-Mason cello

Semyon Bychkov conductor

Czech Philharmonic

“Music expands your imagination, and it lets you express what cannot be said in words. We usually call those emotions.” – Sheku Kanneh-Mason

Winner of the 2016 BBC Young Musician Award, 24-year-old British cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason shot to international fame when he played at the royal wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry two years later. The live broadcast was watched by over 30 million people worldwide: “First I was asked if I would play during the ceremony, and of course I immediately said yes! Then the telephone rang – ‘Hi, this is Meghan Markle. Want to play at my wedding?’ I was completely bowled over.”

For his debut album Inspiration which went onto become a top-seller, amongst other works, Kanneh-Mason recorded Shostakovich’s First Cello Concerto which he has chosen to make his Czech Philharmonic debut with under the baton of Semyon Bychkov. One of the most difficult works in the cello repertoire, Shostakovich wrote his First Cello Concerto after being inspired by the playing of the great Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich. Here it is has been programmed by the Czech Philharmonic’s Chief Conductor between two works of the classical era which also contain powerful musical tension.

First, Haydn’s Symphony No. 22 whose nickname ‘The Philosopher’ does not appear on the preserved original score but dates from the composer’s lifetime. The title is assumed to have been derived from the dialogue between French horns and English horns in the first movement and the contemplative atmosphere of certain parts of the work which may have reminded some listeners at the time of a philosophical dispute. 

When Ludwig van Beethoven was composing his Second Symphony, he was suffering from physical ailments, the most frightening of which was gradual loss of hearing. Without knowing the real cause of the condition, physicians prescribed various therapies, but these did not help leading Beethoven to even consider a voluntary departure from life. One gets an insight into his state of mind when listening to this music which is almost defiant at times. As a critic at the time described the symphony as “…a noisy, wounded giant, a wildly writhing dragon that refuses to die, still bleeding in the finale as it thrashes about furiously with its erect tail.”

Rudolfinum — Dvořák Hall

2/19/2025 Wednesday 10:00 AM
Dress rehearsal
2/19/2025 Wednesday 7:30 PM
2/20/2025 Thursday 7:30 PM
2/21/2025 Friday 7:30 PM

How to buy tickets

Buy online

For online shopping you will be redirected to the website of the Czech Philharmonic.

Personally at the Rudolfinum cash desk

Information not only about available seats will be provided by the customer service of the Czech Philharmonic.

Reservation of seats for current subscribers:
until 3 June 2024, 20.00
Sale of individual tickets for subscription concerts:
from 10 June 2024, 10.00
Ticket sales for all public dress rehearsals:
from 11 September 2024, 10.00

Customer Service of Czech Philharmonic

Tel.: +420 227 059 227
E-mail: info@czechphilharmonic.cz

Customer service is available on weekdays from 9.00 am to 6.00 pm.

Reservation of seats for current subscribers:
until 3 June 2024, 20.00
Sale of individual tickets for subscription concerts:
from 10 June 2024, 10.00
Ticket sales for all public dress rehearsals:
from 11 September 2024, 10.00

Customer Service of Czech Philharmonic

Tel.: +420 227 059 227
E-mail: info@czechphilharmonic.cz

Customer service is available on weekdays from 9.00 am to 6.00 pm.